The Scariest Horror Movies of All Time

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The Scariest Horror Movies of All Time

Cinema critics and academics no longer see horror movies as a genre with a bad reputation as it used to be. Why do horror movies have such a strong impact? True horror has a stronger effect on the brain than just the image blood or separate body parts. A survey revealed what horror movies are considered all-time tops. Have you seen them all?

Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)

Many horror movies have been made before this masterpiece of John Carpenter, but Halloween has discovered the perfect formula for making a ghost holiday unforgettable. Due to the intriguing plot and amazing acting (the main character Laurie Strode was created by Jamie Lee Curtis) this movie has changed the genre of horror movies.

After killing his six-year-old sister during Halloween for an unexplained reason, Michael Myers spent most of his life in a psychiatric hospital. But on the Halloween night of 1978, he returns home to Hudonfield to kill and terrorize Laurie and her friends again. Hiding his face under a terrible white mask, Myers chases and kills throughout the movie, and he seems to be resistant to bullets and blows.

The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)

Even half a century after the premiere of this horror movie, The Exorcist remains one of the scariest horror movies for one simple reason: the contrast between the innocent girl and the demon that has overwhelmed her soul still evokes an original fear. Linda Blair fantastically played twelve-year-old Regan, whose head turns around as she splashes in vomit, demonically laughs, and swears curses, embodies the idea that nothing is sacred. Even Max von Sydow whos always has a Bible does not guarantee that poor Regan and her family will end up well. While creating The Exorcist, William Friedkin gave the screening of the novel of William Peter Blatty the great sophistication.

Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)

From the very beginning when the main character played by Mios Farrow starts singing, this masterpiece of Roman Polanski catches your attention until the last minute. Evil is not an incomprehensible thing in this story about a woman who is intimidated by her husband and her neighbors. This is Satan living nearby. Pregnancy is already a stressful period, even though a group of witches do not gather outside at night. But in this movie, the concern is further heightened by suspicions of poor Rosemary that her husband and her neighbors have reunited with Satan over her unborn baby. Over time, the movie evokes many uncomfortable thoughts about existence and unseen things that might be true.

The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)

This movie has conquered the top position from the very beginning as soon as it was released and so far, no one has surpassed it. The greatest evil is not ghosts or demons of hell, but that darkness what is hidden in our subconscious. There is a certain logic of dreams in The Shining. It suggests that all the things we fear may be true. If your instincts say that your husband might be trying to kill you and your son, that is probably a good reason for such an instinct. Denying is very often necessary for you to live, to survive every day, but horror movies always show that blind denying can kill you. It almost killed Wendy and her son Danny in The Shining.

The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)